Impact factor 0.175

Signa Vitae

A Journal In Intensive Care And Emergency Medicine

Month: October 2006 (Page 1 of 2)

Vasoactive Agents

Abstract

This article is a short review of vasoactive drugs which are in use in todays clinical practice. In the past century, development of vasoactive drugs went through several phases. All of these drugs are today divided into several groups, depending on their place of action, pharmacological pathways and/or effects on target organ or organ system. Hence, many different agents are today in clinical practice, we have shown comparison between them. These agents provide new directions in the treatment of cardiovascular compromise, suggesting that the primary goal of therapy is to produce a vasodilatory effect of the circulation rather than to reverse hemodynamic failure by using inotropic agents, with their inherent risks and side effects.

Key words: vasoactive agents, inotropic agents, levosimendan, phosphodiesterase III inhibitors

Read More

Intraabdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in the intensive care unit

Abstract

Intraabdominal hypertension can induce a significant dysfunction of cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal and central nervous systems. Recently, a prospective multicenter epidemiological study concluded that the intraabdominal hypertension observed in intensive care units was associated with an increased risk of mortality in critically ill patients. In this review, we summarize current literature data concerning definitions and measurement of intraabdominal pressure and discuss the importance of intraabdominal hypertension in critically ill patients. We conclude that intraabdominal pressure should be taken into consideration along with other standard pressure measurements in critically ill patients.

Keywords: intraabdominal pressure, intraabdominal hypertension, abdominal compartment syndrome

Read More

Early postoperative gastric enteral nutrition improves gastric emptying after non-complicated cardiac surgery

Abstract

Background: Postoperative intragastric enteral feeding in cardiac surgery patients is frequently complicated by delayed gastric emptying.
Objective: To evaluate how early postoperative gastric enteral nutrition affects gastric emptying in coronary artery by-pass graft (CABG) surgery patients.
Methods: In this prospective, randomized study a group of 40 patients treated in the intensive care unit after CABG surgery were studied. Patients were divided in two groups: group E (20 patients: age 59±8 yr.; male 70%) and control group C (20 patients: age 58±10 yr.; male 80%), respectively. The paracetamol absorption test was used to evaluate gastric emptying. In group E gastric enteral nutrition begun 18 hours after surgery and 6 hours later this was stopped and paracetamol solution was administered. The patients in group C received only crystalloid solutions for first 24 hours. Blood samples were obtained at 0 (t0), 15 (t+15), 30 (t+30), 60 (t+60) and 120 (t+120) min after administration of paracetamol.
Results:  The values of plasma paracetamol concentration (PPC) at 15 and 120 min were significantly higher in group E when compared with .group C: (t+15) 3.3±2.5 vs. 1.7±1.9 and (t+120) 5.2±2.8 vs. 3.3±1.6 (p <0.05). The PPC values at 30 and 60 min were higher, but not significantly, in group E vs. group C: (t+30) 3.7±2.0 vs. 2.9±2.7 and (t+60) 5.1±3.2 vs. 3.9±3.5 (p = NS). The area under the PPC curve was 429 ± 309 in the E group vs. 293 ± 204 in the group C (p < 0.05).
Conclusion:  Early postoperative gastric administration of nutritients after CABG surgery stimulates gastric emptying.

Key words: Early postoperative enteral nutrition; gastric emptying

Read More

Use of central venous catheters in children

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in the Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of Split University Hospital (SUH). We reviewed the records of all children that had CVCs and were hospitalized between January 2002 and March 2006. Patients were evaluated with respect to their age, gender, catheter type, indication for CVC insertion, site and side of the body of CVC insertion. The duration of catheter use and eventual complications were also taken into consideration. A total of 352 CVCs were inserted in 300 children. Patient age ranged from 0 to 18 years. The average catheter insertion time was 12.88 days. We noted 66 (18.8%) CVC-related complications. Complications related to CVCs insertion were malposition of catheter (5.4%) and pneumothorax (0.9%). Occlusion of CVCs (4.3%), catheter related-bloodstream infections (CRBI) (4.0%), dislodgment (3.7%) and catheter damage (0.6%) were complications associated with lenght of CVCs use. We conclude that central venous catheterization is a safe and efficient procedure with minimal complications in pediatric patients.

Key words: central venous catheter, indications, complications, children.

Read More

Initial bradycardia in hypotensive (hemorrhagic) patients in a prehospital setting – does it have a prognostic value?

Abstract

Introduction. Some studies have shown that the presence of bradycardia in hemorrhage-caused-hypotension is associated with a better prognosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare bradycardic and tachycardic responses to hemorrhaging in a pre-hospital setting and to evaluate the outcome.

Patients and methods. All patiens were adults (>18 years) with tachycardia and bradycardia hypotension (hemorrhaging) in a pre-hospital setting. We compared a tachycardic group with a bradycardic group using the following criteria: age, gender, APACHE II on admission, trauma vs. non-trauma patients, outcome (survival) and the use of vasopressors.
Results. Over a two year period, 107 patients were screened. The tachycardic group was younger in age than the bradycardic group. Tachycardia was significantly more common in males. The bradycardic group had better APACHE II on admission and also better outcome (survival). Mortality was lower in bradycardic patients than in tachycardic patients.
Conclusion. Bradycardia is a real phenomenon in hemorrhaging patients in a prehospital setting. It might be associated with both better APACHE II on admission and better outcome.

Keywords: bradycardia, hypotensive (hemorrhagic) patients, prehospital setting, APACHE II, prognosis.

Read More

Page 1 of 2

© 2015. Signa Vitae. Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.