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Signa Vitae

Journal of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Middle latency auditory evoked potential index for prediction of post-resuscitation survival in elderly populations with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Abstract

Background. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a high mortality rate in the elderly. Although most reports have investigated among elderly patients with OHCA until 1990s, non-invasive monitorings cannot presently predicted cerebral resuscitation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Findings of a previous study suggest that monitoring of middle latency auditory evoked potentials (MLAEP) during CPR could provide an indicator of effective post-resuscitation survival.

Objectives. We speculated that the MLAEP index (MLAEPi), measured in an emergency room, can predict post-resuscitation survival among elderly patients with OHCA.

Methods. This prospective study included 31 elderly patients aged ≥65 years with OHCA who received basic life support (BLS) and did not achieve restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) until arrival at the emergency center between December 2010 and December 2011. All patients were administered advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) in the emergency room. Initial MLAEPi was measured using an MLAEP monitor (aepEX plus®, Audiomex, UK) during the first cycle of ACLS. Prediction of the post-resuscitation survival was investigated.

Results. Eight patients who achieved ROSC were admitted to our hospital and 23 did not achieve ROSC in the emergency room. Initial MLAEPi was significantly higher in patients with than without ROSC (median, 33 vs. 26, p = 0.02). Three survivors, among patients with ROSC, were discharged from our hospital (survivors) and 5 died during hospitalization (non-survivors). Initial MLAEPi was significantly higher in survivors than in non-survivors (median, 35 vs. 28, p = 0.03) or patients without ROSC (median, 35 vs. 26, p < 0.01).

Conclusions. MLAEPi satisfactorily denotes cerebral function and predicts post-resuscitation survival in elderly populations.

Key words: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, basic life support, advanced cardiac life support, age, monitoring, critical care

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Predictors of neurological outcome in the emergency department for elderly patients following out-of-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation

Abstract

Aims. Survival rates for cardiac arrest in acute medicine are higher following out-of-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation (OH-ROSC). However, data pertaining to OH-ROSC is limited in the elderly population. We aimed to assess the predictors of neurological outcome among elderly patients with OH-ROSC.

Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the data of patients 65 years and older who achieved OH-ROSC and who presented to the emergency department (ED) between 2009 and 2013. The following parameters were considered: age, sex, medical history, vital signs, blood values, initial electrical rhythm, witnessed cardiac arrest, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, resuscitation duration, attempted defibrillation, and neurological outcome. Neurological outcomes were evaluated 3 months after cardiac arrest, using the cerebral performance category (CPC) score, and were classified into two groups: favorable outcome (CPC = 1–2) and unfavorable outcome (CPC = 3–5).

Results. Fifty-five patients were studied, of which 21 and 34 patients were classified as having favorable and unfavorable outcomes, respectively. The following values were associated with favorable outcomes: resuscitation duration, initial cardiac rhythm, base excess, pH, lactate levels, the motor response on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and the number of patients with GCS ≤8 (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis confirmed that motor response scores and lactate levels were independent predictors of neurological outcomes.

Conclusions. Lactate levels and GCS motor response measured immediately at ED arrival are likely to be useful to assess the neurological outcomes among elderly patients with OH-ROSC.

Key words: age, basic life support, cardiac arrest, prediction, resuscitation

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Sex Hormones and Gender Effects following Trauma-Hemorrhage

Abstract

Trauma is the leading cause of death in the industrialized world between the ages of one and 40. A number of risk factors including age and gender have been implicated in this regard. It is therefore not surprising that the majority of trauma victims are young males. Their mortality rate following trauma is not only higher compared to females, but they are also more prone to subsequent sepsis. Age and gender are therefore important factors in the prevalence of traumatic injury as well as in susceptibility to subsequent septic complications.

Key words: trauma, mortality, age, gender, sex hormones, sepsis, cardiovascular/immunological alterations

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