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Signa Vitae

A Journal In Intensive Care And Emergency Medicine

Tag: basic life support (Page 1 of 2)

Medical students perform basic life support skills in a simulated scenario better using a 4-stage teaching approach compared to conventional training

Abstract

Introduction. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is influenced by the quality of basic life support (BLS). The primary objective of our study was to compare efficiency in the acquisition of BLS skills using conventional training and the 4-stage approach as a teaching method for BLS training.

Methods. In a prospective, randomised, 2-parallel group study, 266 first year medical students were randomised to either conventional training or the 4-stage approach using 2000 and 2005 ERC (European Resuscitation Council) guidelines. The students were tested immediately after receiving training. Three ERC-certified instructors assessed BLS skills using video recordings.

Results. The students who were taught according to the 4-stage approach using 2000 guidelines preformed significantly better in the following steps: calls for help (p<0.01), opens the airway (p<0.01), places hands for chest compression correctly (p<0.01) and performs chest compressions correctly (p<0.01), while using 2005 guidelines, only chest compression hand position improved significantly in the 4-stage teaching group (p<0.01).

Conclusions. The 4-stage approach improved the efficiency of several steps of the BLS algorithm and the ability to follow the algorithm in the correct sequence using 2000 ERC guidelines, while in students using the 2005 ERC guidelines only chest compression hand position improved significantly. Students who were taught according to 2000 ERC guidelines had significantly better hand position than students who were taught according to 2005 guidelines, independent of teaching method used.

Key words:

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Rescuer fatigue does not correlate to energy expenditure during simulated basic life support

Abstract

It is known that providing basic life support (BLS) may be limited by the physical capabilities of rescuers. The other factor that may affect BLS quality is its energy expenditure. Therefore, we decided to compare the energy expenditure of standard BLS with a compression-ventilation ratio of 30:2 (S-BLS) and compression-only BLS (CO-BLS) and assess the sensation of fatigue and perceived exertion associated with these activities.

Methods. We conducted a simulation study on 10 healthy volunteers using a resuscitation manikin. Participants were randomly assigned to start with CO-BLS or with S-BLS, in accordance with recent guidelines. Later, every individual provided the other type of BLS. BLS was terminated in the event of exhaustion, impossibility to retain high-quality BLS or after 30 minutes of BLS. Energy expenditure was expressed as relative oxygen consumption (VO2/kg) and area under the curve of all VO2/kg measurements during each BLS procedure indexed to one minute (AUCVO2/kg min). All participants completed a survey to assess perceived intensity of exertion by Borg, and sensation of general fatigue by visual analogue scale.

Results. Maximal VO2/kg (23.16±3.94 vs. 20.17±2.14 ml/kg/min, p=0.049) and AUCVO2/kg min (18.90±3.13 vs. 15.91±2.07 ml/min3; p=0.021) during S-BLS were significantly higher compared to CO-BLS. Conversely, a more intense rate of perceived exertion (16.6±2.0 vs. 13.8±1.2, p=0.001) and sensation of general fatigue (86.5±10.8 vs. 75.0±14.3, p=0.058) were associated with CO-BLS. Neither sensation of general fatigue, nor perceived exertion correlated with energy expenditure.

Conclusions. Energy expenditure of S-BLS was higher than of CO-BLS in our study, while sensation of fatigue and perceived exertion reflected the opposite association.

Key words: basic life support, energy expenditure, general fatigue

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Does basic life support training simplification foster retention of life saving maneuvers?

Abstract

Objectives. Simplification of Basic Life Support was proposed with the introduction of Chest-Compression only Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CC-CPR) as an alternative to Standard CPR (S-CPR). This study aimed to compare retention of knowledge, in the general public, of both CPR techniques (CC-CPR vs. S-CPR).

Design, setting and participants. Multicentric prospective comparative cohort study. A training program was conducted among 906 individuals who were assigned to CC-CPR or to S-CPR group. They were evaluated before training (T0), after training (T1) and six months later (T2) on 17 CPR assessment criteria, they were evaluated twice at each time period and one global CPR performance score.

Results. Initial knowledge was low. At T1, all CPR performance criteria improved significantly. Results were similar in both groups except for the rate of trainees calling for help and the time to turn on the automated external defibrillator and to deliver the first shock. At T2, the knowledge level was lower than at T1. Finally, CPR performance score was lower in both groups at T2 compared to T1 but statistically higher than at T0. CPR performance score was higher in the CC-CPR group than in the S-CPR group at T2 (p=0.041).

Conclusions. Performance score was significantly higher in the CC-CPR group. CC-CPR training seems to result in better retention and a faster reaction in the setting of an out of hospital cardiac arrest. Moreover, the retention of knowledge among a trained population fades partially with time. Regular CPR training should therefore be proposed to avoid the loss of benefit with time.

Key words: cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, basic life support, chest compression, mouth-to-mouth ventilation, training, retention

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Predictors of neurological outcome in the emergency department for elderly patients following out-of-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation

Abstract

Aims. Survival rates for cardiac arrest in acute medicine are higher following out-of-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation (OH-ROSC). However, data pertaining to OH-ROSC is limited in the elderly population. We aimed to assess the predictors of neurological outcome among elderly patients with OH-ROSC.

Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the data of patients 65 years and older who achieved OH-ROSC and who presented to the emergency department (ED) between 2009 and 2013. The following parameters were considered: age, sex, medical history, vital signs, blood values, initial electrical rhythm, witnessed cardiac arrest, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, resuscitation duration, attempted defibrillation, and neurological outcome. Neurological outcomes were evaluated 3 months after cardiac arrest, using the cerebral performance category (CPC) score, and were classified into two groups: favorable outcome (CPC = 1–2) and unfavorable outcome (CPC = 3–5).

Results. Fifty-five patients were studied, of which 21 and 34 patients were classified as having favorable and unfavorable outcomes, respectively. The following values were associated with favorable outcomes: resuscitation duration, initial cardiac rhythm, base excess, pH, lactate levels, the motor response on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and the number of patients with GCS ≤8 (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis confirmed that motor response scores and lactate levels were independent predictors of neurological outcomes.

Conclusions. Lactate levels and GCS motor response measured immediately at ED arrival are likely to be useful to assess the neurological outcomes among elderly patients with OH-ROSC.

Key words: age, basic life support, cardiac arrest, prediction, resuscitation

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Automated external defibrillator skills among lay people in the region of Koroska: a pilot study

Abstract

Background. In the region of Koroška, there are more and more public spaces equipped with automated external defibrillators which can be used by a witnessed bystander. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the skills required for using automated external defibrillators.

Methods. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in two family medicine practices. We included volunteers who visited their family doctor during a period of four days. Skills were assessed in a virtual setting using a plastic manikin.

Results. There were 107 participants in the sample, 60.0% were women. Average age of the sample was 47.6±16.8 years. In the practical part (skills testing), the participants earned 2.7 points from a total of 5 points. Younger participants and those who attended a course in basic life support, in the past 10 years, had a significantly higher score.

Conclusion. Lay people need more education regarding skills for using automated external defibrillators.

Key words: automated external defibrillator, basic life support, lay people, survival, cardiac arrest

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