Abstract

Objective. This study evaluated whether chest compression in a standardized in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) set-up can be performed as effectively as when the rescuer is kneeling beside the patient lying on the floor. Specifically, the in-hospital test was standardized according to the rescuers’ average knee height.

Methods. Experimental intervention (test 1) was a standardized, in-hospital CPR set-up: first, the bed height was fixed at 70 cm. Second, the height difference between the bed and a step stool was set to the average knee height of the CPR team members (45 cm). Control intervention (test 2) was kneeling on floor. Thirty-eight medical doctors on the CPR team each performed 2 minutes of chest compressions in test 1 and 2 in random order (cross-over trial). A Little Anne was used as a simulated patient who had experienced cardiac arrest. Chest compression parameters, such as average depth and rate, were measured using an accelerometer device.

Results. In all tests, the average depths were those recommended in the most recent CPR guidelines (50–60 mm); there were no significant differences between Tests 1 and 2 (53.1 ± 4.3 mm vs. 52.6 ± 4.8 mm, respectively; p = 0.398). The average rate in Test 2 (119.1 ± 12.4 numbers/min) was slightly faster than that in Test 1 (116.4 ± 10.2 numbers/min; p = 0.028). No differences were observed in any other parameters.

Conclusions. Chest compression quality in our standardized in-hospital CPR set-up was similar with that performed in a kneeling position on the floor.

Trial Registration: Clinical Research Information Service: KCT0001599

Key words: beds, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, posture

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