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Signa Vitae

Journal of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Atypical Cerebral Infarction in a Patient Suspected Ingestion of Synthetic Cannabinoids

Abstract

Background: Synthetic cannabinoids are recreational street drugs with many known adverse effects.

Case presentation: Here we present the case of an atypical cerebral infarction in a patient with a suspected ingestion of synthetic cannabinoids.

Conclusion: Although synthetic cannabinoids use is not conventionally associated with stroke, some case reports describe cerebral infarction and myocardial infarction with significant synthetic cannabinoids intake. Emergency physicians should know the association of synthetic cannabinoids with seizures, myocardial infarction, and now possibly ischemic stroke.

Key words: stroke, cannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, case report

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The endocannabinoid system in sepsis – a potential target to improve microcirculation?

Abstract

During the last decade, research has identified the endocannabinoid system (ECS) as a key regulator of essential physiological functions, including the regulation of microvascular and immune function. Indeed, increasing evidence now suggests that release of endocannabinoids and activation of cannabinoid receptors occurs during sepsis and that manipulation of the ECS may represent an important therapeutic target to improve microcirculation in sepsis. In this review, the pharmacology and physiology of the ECS and the involvement of cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and non-CB1R/CB2R pathways related to ECS activation will be described. This information will increase our comprehension of the role of lipid signaling pathways in sepsis and may lead to the identification of new drug targets for the treatment of impaired microcirculation.

Key words: systemic inflammation, sepsis, microcirculation, lipid mediators, cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors

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