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Signa Vitae

Journal of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Tag: cardiac arrest (Page 1 of 5)

Why should we switch chest compression providers every 2 minutes during cardiopulmonary resuscitation?

Abstract

Objective. This study was conducted to determine whether trained male rescuers could maintain adequate chest compression depth (CCD) for longer than the current recommended guidelines of 2 minutes.

Methods. Forty male medical doctors administered a 5-minute single rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to a manikin on the floor with conventional CPR or randomly administered continuous chest compressions (CCC). The ratio of compression to ventilation was set to 30:2 with mouth-to-mouth technique during conventional CPR. Chest compression data were recorded with an accelerometer device and divided into 1-minute segments for analysis.

Results. Although average CCD maintained the recommended depths throughout 5 minutes in conventional CPR, it decreased significantly with CCC (1 minute: 55.4 ± 4.5 mm; 2 minutes: 54.2 ± 5.4 mm; 3 minutes: 52.6 ± 5.6 mm; 4 minutes: 51.6 ± 5.5 mm; 5 minutes: 49.9 ± 5.8 mm, p < 0.001). The average chest compression numbers (ACCN) per minute were maintained over 80/min and have not been changed significantly within 5 minutes in the CCC. However, it didn’t reach to the 80/min and decreased significantly after 3minutes compared to the baseline ACCN during first 1-minute segment in the conventional CPR.

Conclusions. Despite the chest compression providers being limited to trained male medical doctors, the average CCD decreased significantly within 5minutes with CCC. Although maintaining adequate CCD, ACCN in each minute decreased significantly after 3minutes in the conventional CPR. Therefore, we should rotate chest compression providers every 2minutes regardless of the rescuer’s qualifications and CPR methods.

Key words: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, cardiac arrest, healthcare provider

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Football referees as first responders in cardiac arrest. Assessment of a Basic Life Support training program.

Abstract

Aim. To assess football referees´ cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills and automated external defibrillator (AED) use in a simulated sport incident scenario, after a brief training program.

Material and Methods. Quasi-experimental study with 35 amateur league football referees. A test – retest of related samples was carried out after the training program. Theoretical and hands-on session lasted 30 minutes, with 1/10 instructor/participant ratio. CPR skills were measured using Wireless Skill Report software and AED use by means of a specific check list.

Results. A third of sample knew what an AED is but only 8% knew how to use it. After training, all participants achieved 70% or higher CPR quality scores and were able to use AED properly (54.2% without any incidence). Mean time to discharge was shorter for participants who accomplished the quality goal (p=0.022).

Conclusions. After a very brief and simple training program, football referees were able to perform a potentially effective CPR and use an AED correctly in a simulated scenario. Basic life support training should be implemented in football referees´ formative curriculum.

Key words: automated external defibrillator, referees, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, basic life support, training, sport, football

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Will Focus do?

Abstract

Ultrasound is an elegant method which provides insight into the patient. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) includes a basic approach to the heart and inferior vena cava (IVC) by ultrasound. By only using the eye-balling method attending physicians can obtain important information for a better understanding of a patient’s pathophysiology. Obtained data can be used immediately and integrated together with other clinical data, which helps physicians in their decision-making process.

Key words: focused cardiac ultrasound, point of care ultrasound, physicians performed ultrasound, hemodynamic monitoring, shock, cardiac arrest

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The effect of posture modification during continuous one-handed chest compression: A pilot study using in-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest simulation

Abstract

Background. We modified the posture of the one-handed chest compression (MOHCC) as follows: first, the axis of the rescuer’s compression hand was adjusted to the lower half of the patient’s sternum; second, the opposite hand was wrapped around the elbow joint of the rescuer’s compression arm. This study evaluated the effect of the MOHCC on the mean chest compression depth (MCD) over time.

Methods. Thirty medical doctors conducted 2 min of continuous MOHCC without ventilation using the in-hospital pediatric arrest model (70-cm-high bed, 25-cm-high stepstool, a pediatric manikin and a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) meter). The MCD and mean chest compression rate (MCR) were measured at 30 s intervals using the Q-CPR review software.

Results. The MCD changed significantly over time (0–30 s, 41.9–44.7 mm; 30–60 s, 40.4–43.6 mm; 60–90 s, 39.2–42.8 mm; 90–120 s, 38.6–42.3 mm; [95% CI], P=0.002). However, it did not decrease significantly between 60–90 s and 90–120 s (P=0.173). The total decrease in MCD was 2.9 mm over a 2 min period. The MCR did not change significantly over time (0–30 s, 108.6–118.9 /min; 30–60 s, 107.9–119.1 /min; 60–90 s, 107.7–119.3 /min; 90–120 s, 107.4–119.0 /min; P=0.800).

Conclusions. Although the MCD changed significantly over a 2 min period, it did not decrease significantly after 90 s during performance of MOHCC. The MOHCC might be considered when the one-handed chest compression (OHCC) is selected as a chest compression method for cardiac arrest in small children.

Key words: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, cardiac arrest, child, fatigue

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Effects of therapeutic hypothermia and kinetics of serum protein S100B after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Abstract

Introduction. Post-resuscitation care is regulated by international guidelines. A milestone of these is the application of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). The aims of our study were: to determine the 30-day-mortality for our patients, to monitor the efficacy and effects of TH, and to investigate serum protein S100B – as an early prognostic marker.

Materials and Methods. In our study, 57 patients, treated after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a multidisciplinary intensive care unit, were included. Patients were divided into groups who received and who didn’t receive TH. 30-day-mortality was determined as an end-point. Effects of TH were monitored using statistical analysis according to clinical parameters and laboratory tests. Serum protein S100B levels were measured with ELISA technique on 20 randomised patients at admission and the 1st, 3rd and 5th day after CPR.

Results. Total 30-day-mortality was 74%. TH did not reduced the 30-day-mortality (73% vs. 74%, p>0.05). We found a significant correlation between TH and serum lactate concentration after admission (0h, p=0.006) and at 12 (p=0.045) and 36 (p=0.049) hours after CPR. On the 3rd (p=0.005) and 4th (p=0.043) day after CPR, as a result of TH, platelet count was significantly higher compared to normothermic samples. There was no significant difference in protein S100B levels between the normothermic and TH group and protein S100B levels did not correlate with 30-day-mortality.

Conclusion. Despite recommendations of international guidelines, we cannot prove the beneficial effect of TH, or a correlation of protein S100B levels with a positive outcome.

Key words: cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, post-resuscitation care, therapeutic hypothermia, protein S100B

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