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Signa Vitae

A Journal In Intensive Care And Emergency Medicine

Tag: emergency medicine

History of professional education on podiatry emergencies and disasters: a Spanish point of view

Abstract

Mainstreaming between podiatry practice and podiatry studies is needed. Podiatry practice evolution in Spain has allowed this medical discipline to obtain its own academic, institutional and legislative framework to increase and improve professional decisions in the podiatric medical practice. For that reason, there is a great interest and relevancy on emergencies and urgencies education in podiatry clinical and welfare activity. It is an essential component, the different and inherent risk conditions of welfare activity require to give an immediate, accurate and sure response that protects people life. Podiatry faculties could and should establish joint actions that integrate on an effective way the complexity and multiplicity of vital situations that the podiatric activity involves, as well as to establish strategic plans in the activity of professional podiatrists that come together in an improvement of graduates.

Key words: education, Emergency medicine, podiatry, disasters

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Chinese research status in emergency medicine journals: a bibliometric analysis based on Science Citation Index Expanded database

Abstract

Background. Emergency medicine in China has undergone tremendous growth. This study was conducted to evaluate the Chinese scientific output on emergency medicine in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) in the Web of Science during the period of 2000–2013.

Methods. A bibliometric analysis was applied in this study. Articles published by China in SCIE emergency medicine journals were included. They were analyzed in terms of publication outputs, document type, language of publication, journals, countries/territories, institutions, and collaboration patterns. Distributions of article titles and keywords were also studied to reveal research focuses and trends.

Results. During the period, a total of 1043 articles from China were published in SCIE emergency medicine journals. Seven documents types were found, and the journal article was the most frequently used. All articles were written in English. The Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine is the most productive journal. The most productive institutes were Prince Wales Hospital, followed by Tuen Mun Hospital, Chinese University Hong Kong; USA dominated the collaborative countries. The ‘‘injury/injuries’’, ‘‘trauma’’, “acute”, “rat/rats”, “arrest”, ‘‘emergency’’, and ‘‘cardiopulmonary’’, ‘‘resuscitation’’ were the hot spots of emergency medicine research in China.

Conclusion. The results map emergency medicine (EM) development and research trends in China, and potentially guide Chinese EM physicians in evaluating and orienting their research.

Key words: emergency medicine, china, bibliometric, science citation index expanded, research

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Continuous cardiopulmonary resuscitation training compared to single training by laypersons

Abstract

Background. Compression-Only Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (COCPR) has been broadly studied during the last few years and specially introduced into lay rescuers’ training. The aim of the study was to compare the quality of COCPR performed by laypersons (Group A) who attended a single cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training course, and those (Group B) who underwent regular CPR training every 6 months.

Methods. Both groups completed the “Heartsaver CPR AED” course of the American Heart Association. After 30 minutes they were required to perform COCPR on a manikin with a skills reporter system.

Results. Comparing the 76 once only trained laypersons to the 74 continuously trained lay rescuers, we found that average age (20 versus 40 years old), male gender (54% versus 93%), body mass index (BMI) (24.9 versus 27.3 kg/m2) and regular physical exercise (55% versus 36%) proved significant predictors, p<0.01, p<0.01, p<0.01 and p=0.04 respectively. Regarding COCPR-quality, the percentage of efficient chest compressions (43% versus 58%), average depth of compression (45 versus 50 mm) and percentage of error-free compressions (36% versus 50%) indicated a significant statistical difference, with p=0.01, p=0.01 and p<0.01 respectively. However, the average frequency of compressions per minute (121 versus 124), the percentage of correct hand positioning during chest compressions (87% versus 90%) and the average duty cycle (47% versus 45%) did not display a significant difference.

Conclusion. The continuous CPR training group obtained better results regarding quality of chest compressions when compared with single CPR training.

Key words: cardiac massage, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, emergency medicine, resuscitation

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Electrocardiography interpretation training in emergency medicine: methods, resources, competency assessment, and national standardization

Abstract

Objective(s). The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of electrocardiography (ECG) training in emergency medicine residency programs in Turkey, and the attitude of the program representatives towards standardization of such training.

Methods. This investigation was planned as a cross-sectional study. An 18-item questionnaire was distributed to directors of residency programs. Responses were evaluated using SPSS (v.16.0), and analyzed using the chi-square test.

Results. Thirty-nine program directors (out of 42) responded to the questionnaire. Twenty-eight of them stated they did not have a formal ECG training curriculum. The most preferred ECG education method was clinical education in the Emergency Department; the most common education resource was ECG textbooks; and the most common evaluation method was case scenarios. Only thirteen of the programs had an obligation to prove competency. The most common competency-assessment method was obtaining a passing grade based on an instructor’s observation. The majority of program directors are of the opinion that there should be a formal ECG teaching curriculum, and that a national ECG training program and national ECG database should be formed.

Conclusions. The majority of programs do not have a formal ECG interpretation curriculum, which is an obligation to prove competency. As a result, their training methods, resources, and assessment tools were determined to be subjective.

Key words: emergency medicine, electrocardiography, education

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CPR quality reduced due to physical fatigue after a water rescue in a swimming pool

Abstract

Objective. This study aimed to analyse the influence of physical fatigue, resulting from a simulated aquatic rescue, at a swimming pool, on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) delivered by the rescuer.

Design, setting and participants. An intragroup design with 27 lifeguards was used in this study. The quality of CPR delivery was evaluated for two minutes for all subjects while they were at rest (test 1), as well as after a simulated aquatic rescue at a swimming pool (test 2). A Resusci Anne® SkillReporter™ (Laerdal Medical Limited, Norway) manikin was used to retrieve reports on CPR delivery, compliant with the most recent international guidelines (30:2, chest compression: ventilation ratio).

Results. Rescue-related physical fatigue had a significant influence on the total number of chest compressions as well as on the ratio of correct chest compressions. Physical fatigue triggered by a swimming pool water rescue negatively influenced CPR delivery quality. These results show that the detrimental effects of physical fatigue on CPR delivery remain important, even in a swimming pool environment.

Conclusions. Training programs should reflect this finding, and focus on enabling lifeguards to deliver proper CPR, even while exhausted and for long periods of time.

Key words: emergency medicine, drowning, resuscitation

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