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Signa Vitae

A Journal In Intensive Care And Emergency Medicine

Tag: mechanical ventilation

Late onset perinatal sepsis in the neonatology intensive care unit – risk factors

Abstract

The lowest-birth-weight premature is very susceptible for nosocomial infections. These infants require the most invasive therapeutic interventions and the longest exposure to environment conductive for microbial colonization. Incidence of nosocomial infection and risk factors in premature has been compared over two years, 2010 and 2015. We examined the effects of common procedures on the incidence of nosocomial sepsis. Birth weight, distribution of pathogens and the therapeutically procedures had been analysed. We tried to find strategies to minimise the risks for acquiring sepsis. Hospital documentation from neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has been analysed retrospectively during two different years in the University Hospital Osijek. Incidence of nosocomial sepsis among hospitalised premature has been 8.9% in 2010, and 4.8% in 2015. The highest rate of affected infants weighed below 1,500 g in both periods. Statistically significance in these two periods has been found in the percentage of pre-term infants with umbilical vein catheter (UVC), and in the number of pre-term on invasive mechanical ventilation. The most common pathogen in 2010 was methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and in 2015 coagulase negative Staphylococci (CONS). The percentage of Candida parapsylosis was higher in 2015. Lowering the incidence of late-onset sepsis has been accomplished by using peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Invasive procedures must be avoided as much as possible.

Key words: low-birth-weight pre-term infants, nosocomial infections, risk factors, umbilical venous catheters, NICU, PICC, mechanical ventilation, high-flow nasal cannula

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Advantage of spontaneous breathing in patients with respiratory failure

Abstract

The fact that different modalities of mechanical ventilation are associated with a number of serious side effects and risks and can influence the clinical outcome of patients, the various modes of mechanical ventilation have, over the past ten years, been the subject of a wide variety of scientific studies. Many of these modalities are designed for partial ventilatory support, which might reflect the complexity of the issue of patient’s ventilator interactions when spontaneous breathing activity is present, compared to controlled mechanical ventilation. Spontaneous breathing modes during mechanical ventilation may integrate intrinsic feedback mechanisms that should help prevent ventilator- induced lung injury and improve synchrony between the ventilator and the patient’s demand. The improvements in pulmonary gas exchange, systemic blood flow, and oxygen supply to the tissue that have been observed when spontaneous breathing has been maintained during mechanical ventilation are reflected in the clinical improvement in the patient’ s condition. It is the aim of this article to review the effects of preserved spontaneous breathing activity during mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure.

Key words: mechanical ventilation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilation mode, spontaneous breathing

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Tracheotomy versus prolonged intubation in medical intensive care unit patients

Abstract

Introduction. The contribution of tracheotomy in comparison to intubation in patients on the resuscitation ward is debated. The main purpose of our study is to assess if tracheotomy compared to prolonged intubation, reduces the whole duration of ventilation, the frequency of nosocomial pneumopathy, the mean duration of hospitalisation in the resuscitation ward and mortality.
Patients and method. It is a retrospective and comparative study between two groups of patients who presented neurological or respiratory pathology and required mechanical ventilation for more than three weeks. The study lasted 7 years and involved 60 patients divided into 2 groups : the Tracheotomy Group (TG, n=30), in which a tracheotomy was performed between the eighth day and the fifteenth day, after the first period of tracheal intubation; and the Intubation Group (IG, n=30), where the patients were intubated throughout the period of hospitalization until extubation or death. We monitored the whole duration of ventilation, the frequency of nosocomial pneumopathy, the incidence of each technique as well as the mean duration of hospitalization in the resuscitation ward and the mortality rate. The two groups were similar in age, sex and gravity score : SAPS II and APACHE II.
Results. The results showed a significant statistical decrease of the whole duration of mechanical ventilation for the TG: 27.03 ± 3.31 days versus 31.63 ± 6.05 days for the IG (P = 0.001). However, there is no significant difference between the two groups, whereas the frequency of nosocomial pneumopathy is about 53.3% in the group with tracheotomy versus 70% for the intubated group (P = 0.18). This shows, on the other hand, the late prevalence of nosocomial pneumopathy in the tracheotomy group patients.
We noticed one case of bleeding after tracheotomy. Sinusitis was also diagnosed but without a significant difference between the two groups, 6.7% (2 cases) in the TG and 10% (3 cases) for the IG (P = 0.31). The mean duration of hospitalization didn’t differ between the two groups; it was 30.96 ± 9.47 days for the TG versus 34.26 ± 9.74 days for the IG (P = 0.10). The study shows that there is no statistically significant difference in mortality between the two groups, 26.7% in the TG versus 46.7% for the IG (P = 0.10).
Conclusion. It seems that tracheotomy, in medical ICU patients, leads to a shorter duration of ventilation, delayed nosocomial pneumopathy without the modification of its frequency and the mean duration of hospitalization or death.

Keywords: tracheotomy, prolonged intubation, pneumopathy, mechanical ventilation, mortality

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Mediastinal tube placement in a premature infant with cardiorespiratory derangement due to ventilator associated pneumomediastinum

Abstract

While mediastinal free air in the ventilated newborn is usually benign, tension pneumomediastinum can lead to further cardiorespiratory compromise due to the compression of mediastinal structures, including the heart and large blood vessels. The authors present a case of life-threatening pneumomediastinum in a ventilated preterm leading to abrupt onset of cardiorespiratory failure. An 8 French (Fr) drainage catheter was placed in the anterior mediastinum using the 2nd right intercostal space as an insertion site, with prompt hemodynamic improvement. A brief description of the drainage technique and a literature review is presented.

Key words: hemodynamics, mechanical ventilation, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, thoracocentesis

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