Abstract

Objectives. The clinical course and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCPA) due to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is unclear. The objective of this study is to clarify them.
Study design. Single- center, observational study.
Setting. We usually perform a brain computed tomography (CT) in OHCPA patients who present without a clear etiology (42% of all OHCPA), such as trauma, to determine the cause of OHCPA and to guide treatment.
Patients. The study included OHCPA patients without a clear etiology, who were transferred to our center and who underwent a brain CT during resuscitation.
Methods of measurement. Patients’ records were reviewed; initial cardiac rhythm, existence of a witness and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts (CPR) were compared with patients’ outcomes.
Results. Sixty-six patients were enrolled. 72.7% achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), 71.2% were admitted, 30.3% survived more than 7 days, and 9.1. survived-to-discharge. In 41 witnessed OHCPA, 87.8% obtained ROSC, 85.4% were admitted, and 14.6% survived-to-discharge. All survivors were witnessed. In 25 non-witnessed OHCPA, 48% obtained ROSC and were admitted, and no patients were discharged. Initial cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation (VF), pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole in 3.0%, 39.4%, and 47.0%. In 2 VF patients 50.0% survived-to- discharge, and there was no survivor with PEA or asystole.
Conclusion. This study shows a high rate of ROSC and admission in OHCPA patients with a SAH, and also reveals their very poor neurological outcome. We conclude that the detection of a SAH in OHCPA patients is important to determine the accurate frequency of SAH in this patient group and to guide appropriate treatment of all OHCPA patients.

Keywords: out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, brain CT, outcome, autopsy imaging, postmortem imaging

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