Impact factor 0.175

Signa Vitae

Journal of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Tag: resuscitation (Page 1 of 2)

Ethical dilemmas in delivery room and NICU

Abstract

Primigravida in 23/24 weeks of twin pregnancy after IVF/ET with chorioamnionitis and visible amniotic membranes of first twin was admitted to our hospital demanding caesarean section. Ethical Committee declined patient’s request, and within 20 minutes vaginal delivery occur. The first twin’s fetal weight was 610g with a 1-minute Apgar score of 3 and a 5-minute score of 4. The neonate was immediately resuscitated, intubated and required mechanical ventilation with Surfactant endotracheal administration. On the first postpartal day an ultrasound examination detected a grade 3 intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) with clot dissolving and convulsions in clinical status. The newborn was hyperglycaemic with confirmed perinatal infection and a grade 1 necrotic enterocolitis (NEC). Regarding persistent ductus arteriosus indomethacin was administered. During the NICU stay porencephalic cysts and hydrocephalus arose without visible brain tissue. On the 75th postpartal day cardiorespiratory insufficiency occurred with lethal outcome. The second twin’s fetal weight was 680g with a 1-minute Apgar score of 2 and a 5-minute Apgar score of 3. The baby was born with bradycardia and had a few gasps. The neonate was immediately resuscitated, intubated and high-frequency mechanically ventilated. Surfactant was administered endotracheally. An ultrasound detected grade 3 IVH. Lethal outcome appeared on first postpartal day. In the second case there was a premature delivery of neonates of 23 weeks gestational age, BW 749g. The parents were not interested in resuscitation, and the baby showed weak signs of life. The issue of whether or not to intubate arose. Therefore, a dilemma appeared – to reanimate in such conditions, or not? To use an aggressive approach in the NICU, or not? There were ethical dilemmas within the medical personnel regarding resuscitation in such conditions considering the presented clinical and laboratory findings from the first postpartal day. Comfort care is probably the best option, but without medico-legal regulations this is impossible.

Key words: extremely low gestational age infants, ethical dilemmas, resuscitation, delivery room, NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit)

Read More

Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: could antioxidants be the answer?

Introduction

Antioxidants are molecules that inhibit oxidation which under certain conditions leads to the production of free radicals, highly reactive species characterized by an unpaired electron which enter into further chain reactions that lead to cell damage. (1) In biological systems these include reactive oxygen species (ROS) which include the hydroxyl radical (OH.), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the superoxide anion (O2.-) among others. The generation of such species may trigger a variety of pathological responses and any disequilibrium between production of ROS and the ability to attenuate the damage that such species may incur is referred to as oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may result in damage to any component of the cell and may result in DNA damage through base damage as well as strand breaks and also some ROS may act as cellular messengers causing disruption in cellular signaling. Cellular protection against oxidative stress may be through chelation of trace metals involved in free radical generation or through the actions of antioxidants. Antioxidants are broadly classified into two groups, depending on whether they are soluble in water (hydrophilic), such as vitamin C or fat soluble such as Vitamin E (lipophilic). Hydrophilic antioxidants are thought to predominantly react with oxidants in the cell cytosol and plasma whereas lipophilic antioxidants protect cell membranes from oxidation: a process termed lipid peroxidation. (2) The synergism between different antioxidant systems is complex. Indeed, both vitamin C and vitamin E were shown to have a direct interaction with vitamin C “repairing” the α-tocopherol radical with rates approaching diffusion limited outlining the reactivity of these species. (3)

One of the areas that has attracted considerable interest with regard to the role of oxidative stress is the host response to sepsis. (4) Sepsis remains a major cause of death worldwide affecting over 18 million people annually with a mortality rate approaching 80% in those individuals with multi-organ failure and in the US hospital costs total over $24 billion dollars. (5, 6) Therapy for severe sepsis is predominantly supportive with the relatively recent introduction of care bundles including antibiotic therapy being introduced. However, the precise pathogenesis of sepsis-induced organ failure remains elusive and although likely multifactorial in nature certainly microvascular dysfunction appears to be central to the process. (7) Microvascular dysfunction involves impairment of arteriolar reactivity, derangement of endothelial barrier integrity and microthombi induced plugging of the capillaries thus any therapy that addresses these issues may translate into improved outcomes.

Key words: sepsis, antioxidants, resuscitation

Read More

Continuous cardiopulmonary resuscitation training compared to single training by laypersons

Abstract

Background. Compression-Only Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (COCPR) has been broadly studied during the last few years and specially introduced into lay rescuers’ training. The aim of the study was to compare the quality of COCPR performed by laypersons (Group A) who attended a single cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training course, and those (Group B) who underwent regular CPR training every 6 months.

Methods. Both groups completed the “Heartsaver CPR AED” course of the American Heart Association. After 30 minutes they were required to perform COCPR on a manikin with a skills reporter system.

Results. Comparing the 76 once only trained laypersons to the 74 continuously trained lay rescuers, we found that average age (20 versus 40 years old), male gender (54% versus 93%), body mass index (BMI) (24.9 versus 27.3 kg/m2) and regular physical exercise (55% versus 36%) proved significant predictors, p<0.01, p<0.01, p<0.01 and p=0.04 respectively. Regarding COCPR-quality, the percentage of efficient chest compressions (43% versus 58%), average depth of compression (45 versus 50 mm) and percentage of error-free compressions (36% versus 50%) indicated a significant statistical difference, with p=0.01, p=0.01 and p<0.01 respectively. However, the average frequency of compressions per minute (121 versus 124), the percentage of correct hand positioning during chest compressions (87% versus 90%) and the average duty cycle (47% versus 45%) did not display a significant difference.

Conclusion. The continuous CPR training group obtained better results regarding quality of chest compressions when compared with single CPR training.

Key words: cardiac massage, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, emergency medicine, resuscitation

Read More

Predictors of neurological outcome in the emergency department for elderly patients following out-of-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation

Abstract

Aims. Survival rates for cardiac arrest in acute medicine are higher following out-of-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation (OH-ROSC). However, data pertaining to OH-ROSC is limited in the elderly population. We aimed to assess the predictors of neurological outcome among elderly patients with OH-ROSC.

Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the data of patients 65 years and older who achieved OH-ROSC and who presented to the emergency department (ED) between 2009 and 2013. The following parameters were considered: age, sex, medical history, vital signs, blood values, initial electrical rhythm, witnessed cardiac arrest, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, resuscitation duration, attempted defibrillation, and neurological outcome. Neurological outcomes were evaluated 3 months after cardiac arrest, using the cerebral performance category (CPC) score, and were classified into two groups: favorable outcome (CPC = 1–2) and unfavorable outcome (CPC = 3–5).

Results. Fifty-five patients were studied, of which 21 and 34 patients were classified as having favorable and unfavorable outcomes, respectively. The following values were associated with favorable outcomes: resuscitation duration, initial cardiac rhythm, base excess, pH, lactate levels, the motor response on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and the number of patients with GCS ≤8 (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis confirmed that motor response scores and lactate levels were independent predictors of neurological outcomes.

Conclusions. Lactate levels and GCS motor response measured immediately at ED arrival are likely to be useful to assess the neurological outcomes among elderly patients with OH-ROSC.

Key words: age, basic life support, cardiac arrest, prediction, resuscitation

Read More

CPR quality reduced due to physical fatigue after a water rescue in a swimming pool

Abstract

Objective. This study aimed to analyse the influence of physical fatigue, resulting from a simulated aquatic rescue, at a swimming pool, on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) delivered by the rescuer.

Design, setting and participants. An intragroup design with 27 lifeguards was used in this study. The quality of CPR delivery was evaluated for two minutes for all subjects while they were at rest (test 1), as well as after a simulated aquatic rescue at a swimming pool (test 2). A Resusci Anne® SkillReporter™ (Laerdal Medical Limited, Norway) manikin was used to retrieve reports on CPR delivery, compliant with the most recent international guidelines (30:2, chest compression: ventilation ratio).

Results. Rescue-related physical fatigue had a significant influence on the total number of chest compressions as well as on the ratio of correct chest compressions. Physical fatigue triggered by a swimming pool water rescue negatively influenced CPR delivery quality. These results show that the detrimental effects of physical fatigue on CPR delivery remain important, even in a swimming pool environment.

Conclusions. Training programs should reflect this finding, and focus on enabling lifeguards to deliver proper CPR, even while exhausted and for long periods of time.

Key words: emergency medicine, drowning, resuscitation

Read More

Page 1 of 2

© 2018. Signa Vitae. Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.