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Signa Vitae

Journal of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Category: Reviews (Page 1 of 17)

A prognostic value of early urinary biomarkers NGAL and IL-18 in critically ill children: a 10-year literature review

Abstract

Introduction. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a life-threatening syndrome caused by a sudden and rapidly progressing impairment of renal function. It is a common and complicated clinical entity among hospitalized children, occurring in 2%-4.5% of children treated in a pediatric intensive care unit. Mortality among such patients remains high (from 8% to 89%) despite improving patient care and technical possibilities. The stage of renal damage is a reversible process, and its timely detection would prevent the progression of renal damage and thus reduce pediatric mortality rates. Therefore, modern medicine necessitates the identification of novel AKI biomarkers that would correlate with renal cell damage and could be detected earlier than a rise in serum creatinine (sCr). Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and interleukin 18 (IL-18) are one of such early markers of AKI.

Aim. To carry out a literature review of studies on changes in NGAL and IL-18 levels in the urine of critically ill patients and to determine a prognostic value of these biomarkers in the detection of renal injury and impact on disease outcomes.

Material and methods. This literature review includes the publications of biomedical studies assessing early biomarkers of AKI in urine (uNGAL or uIL-18) of critically ill children, published in English during the 10-year period. Search for publication was performed in the PubMed database.

Results. Analysis included 10 studies that investigated early biomarkers of AKI (NGAL or IL-18) in urine of critically ill children and compared them with sCr. Among the biomedical studies analyzed in our literature review, 9 measured the NGAL level in urine or both in urine and serum, while 2measured IL-18 in urine. It was determined that uNGAL and uIL-18 were good early diagnostic biomarkers of AKI, which increased 48 h earlier than Cr in serum (P<0.005). The meta-analysis carried out by Haase et al. showed that uNGAL predicted the development of AKI better in critically ill children than in adults (OR, 25.4; ROC, 0.930 vs. OR, 10.6; ROC, 0.782). Three studies reported that the uNGAL level in study populations with AKI directly depended on disease severity and AKI degree (P<0.005). Four studies found that uNGAL and one study that uIL-18 are good predictive factors of mortality (P<0.005).

Conclusions. uNGAL and uIL-18 are early predictive biomarkers of AKI in critically ill children. uNGAL and uIL-18 level correlated well with disease severity and are independent predictive biomarkers of mortality.

Key words: acute kidney injury, critically ill children, biomarkers, uNGAL, uIL-18.

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Can partial splenectomy preserve humoral immunity in pediatric patients?

Abstract

The spleen plays an important role in removing normal and abnormal cells from the blood and in providing an immunologic response to encapsulated bacteria. Surgical splenectomy provides effective treatment for several pediatric disorders, such as congenital and acquired hemolytic anemias, abdominal traumas and immunological and metabolic disorders, but it is associated with an immediate and lifelong risk of overwhelming infection. An alternative to conventional splenectomy is partial splenectomy, recommended especially in children younger than 5 years of age. Recommendations for the prevention of overwhelming post-total splenectomy infection include: Pneumococcal, Haemophilus influenzae type B and Meningococcal immunizations, antimicrobial prophylaxis and prompt antibiotic treatment of acute febrile illness; conversely, there is no clear evidence indicating which prevention measures are to be performed in patients undergoing partial splenectomy.

Key words: partial splenectomy, children, immunization

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The application of ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure for cardiothoracic disorders

Abstract

The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure was primarily developed to reverse temporary tracheal occlusion in patients with fetal surgery for congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Nowadays, it is widely used to resect fetal neck masses and to maintain an unobstructed airway. It is indicated for the management of several cardiothoracic diseases, including mediastinal or lung mass resection, drainage of pleural effusions, palliative treatment of critical congenital heart disease and establishment of EXIT-to-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). EXIT has been attempted successfully in many centers, and it has been proven that mothers and babies tolerate the procedure well. Maternal and fetal surveillance during anesthesia is important to maintain maternal blood pressure and placental blood flow and fetal oxygenation. The aim of this article is to discuss the application of the EXIT procedure for the management of fetal cardiothoracic diseases.

Key words: anesthesia, fetus, mediastinal neoplasms, pleural effusion

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Do we need an individual approach to atrial fibrillation and adrenergic overload in the critically ill?

Abstract

Despite catecholamines being lifesaving drugs, they can also be harmful. Adrenergic overload is one of the major causes of supra- and ventricular arrhythmias, which induce haemodynamic instability of critically ill patients. In this paper we will focus on the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF), the importance of adrenergic overload for triggering AF, the importance of the autonomic nervous system and we will challenge the importance of decreasing adrenergic load with selective and non-selective β-blockers, which have different effects on the metabolism of the severely ill. We will also emphasize the importance of an individual approach due to pharmacogenetic differences in β-adrenergic signalling.

Key words: catecholamines, atrial fibrillation, beta-blockers, metabolism, resting energy expenditure

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Pulmonary reperfusion injury

Abstract

Pulmonary reperfusion injury is a clinical syndrome with no single and recognized pathophysiologic mechanism. It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality following lung transplantation, cardiogenic shock, or cardiopulmonary bypass. The underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Lung inflammatory injury induced by lipopolysaccharide, characterized by rapid sequestration of neutrophils in response to inflammatory chemokines and cytokines released in the lungs is an acceptable theory. Structural or functional impairment of surfactant has been noted in pulmonary reperfusion injury. The pathological changes may include bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, reduced lung compliance and worsening of gas exchange in the immediate posttransplant period. Recruitment maneuver and high positive end-expiratory pressure can relieve postoperative respiratory failure, especially in the patient with reperfusion pulmonary edema after pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Pharmaceutical agents, including inhaled nitric oxide, soluble complement receptor type 1, prostaglandin E1 and exogenous surfactant, attenuate pulmonary reperfusion injury through distinct mechanisms. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and Novalung are temporary assistance in bridging to lung transplantation, stabilization of hemodynamics during transplantation and treatment of severe lung dysfunction and primary graft failure. Modulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression, ischemic conditioning and gene therapy are future directions for pulmonary reperfusion injury management.

Key words: cardiopulmonary bypass, pulmonary hypertension, respiratory insufficiency

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