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Original Research

Open Access

Does basic life support training simplification foster retention of life saving maneuvers?

  • PASCAL CASSAN1
  • JOSEPHINE ESCUTNAIRE1
  • JACQUES MANSOURATI2,3
  • EVGENIYA BABYKINA2
  • DANIEL MEYRAN1
  • ETIENNE ALIOT5
  • CELINE DOS SANTOS4
  • HERVE HUBERT2

1French Red Cross, First Aid and Emergency Department, Paris, France

2Public Health Department EA 2694, University of Lille, Lille, France

3Department of Cardiology, University Hospital of Brest and EA 4324 ORPHY, University of Western Brittany, Brest, France

4Fédération Française de Cardiologie, Paris, France

5Department of Cardiology, University Hospital of Nancy, Nancy, France

DOI: 10.22514/SV111.052016.3 Vol.11,Issue 1,May 2016 pp.33-55

Published: 02 May 2016

*Corresponding Author(s): HERVE HUBERT E-mail: herve.hubert@registreac.org

Abstract

Objectives. Simplification of Basic Life Support was proposed with the introduction of Chest-Compression only Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CC-CPR) as an alternative to Standard CPR (S-CPR). This study aimed to compare retention of knowledge, in the general public, of both CPR techniques (CC-CPR vs. S-CPR).

Design, setting and participants. Multicentric prospective comparative cohort study. A training program was conducted among 906 individuals who were assigned to CC-CPR or to S-CPR group. They were evaluated before training (T0), after training (T1) and six months later (T2) on 17 CPR assessment criteria, they were evaluated twice at each time period and one global CPR performance score.

Results. Initial knowledge was low. At T1, all CPR performance criteria improved significantly. Results were similar in both groups except for the rate of trainees calling for help and the time to turn on the automated external defibrillator and to deliver the first shock. At T2, the knowledge level was lower than at T1. Finally, CPR performance score was lower in both groups at T2 compared to T1 but statistically higher than at T0. CPR performance score was higher in the CC-CPR group than in the S-CPR group at T2 (p=0.041).

Conclusions. Performance score was significantly higher in the CC-CPR group. CC-CPR training seems to result in better retention and a faster reaction in the setting of an out of hospital cardiac arrest. Moreover, the retention of knowledge among a trained population fades partially with time. Regular CPR training should therefore be proposed to avoid the loss of benefit with time.

Keywords

cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, basic life support, chest compression, mouth-to-mouth ventilation, training, retention

Cite and Share

PASCAL CASSAN,JOSEPHINE ESCUTNAIRE,JACQUES MANSOURATI,EVGENIYA BABYKINA,DANIEL MEYRAN,ETIENNE ALIOT,CELINE DOS SANTOS,HERVE HUBERT. Does basic life support training simplification foster retention of life saving maneuvers?. Signa Vitae. 2016. 11(1);33-55.

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