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Original Research

Open Access

The effects of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in dyspnea patients with and without hypercapnia in the emergency department: a retrospective, propensity score-matched cohort study

  • Heajin Chung1
  • Young Shin Cho1,*,
  • Suyeon Park2,3

1Department of Emergency Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, 04401 Seoul, Republic of Korea

2Department of biostatistics, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, 04401 Seoul, Republic of Korea

3Department of Applied Statistics, Chung-Ang University, 06981 Seoul, Republic of Korea

DOI: 10.22514/sv.2022.037

Submitted: 12 February 2022 Accepted: 29 March 2022

Online publish date: 11 May 2022

*Corresponding Author(s): Young Shin Cho E-mail: emcys@schmc.ac.kr

Abstract

We aimed to study the difference in treatment outcomes and prognoses in patients with or without hypercapnia who visited the emergency department for dyspnea and received high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. This was a retrospective observational study. Patients who received HFNC therapy were divided into hypercapnic and non-hypercapnic. The intubation rates were compared for the primary outcome. For the secondary outcomes, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, length of hospital stay, length of ICU stay, and mortality were compared. Moreover, changes in arterial blood gas results were reported in terms of group, time, and group-by-time interaction. A total of 517 patients were enrolled, of whom 126 were included in the hypercapnic group. After propensity score matching, 94 patients were selected. The intubation rate was not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.23). No differences were found in ICU admission, length of hospital stay, length of ICU stay, and mortality. The changes in arterial blood gas results pre- and post-HFNC therapy showed a difference in the group-by-time interaction for partial pressure of carbon dioxide (p = 0.038). We found that there was no difference in treatment outcomes and prognoses in patients with or without hypercapnia who visited the emergency department for dyspnea and received HFNC therapy.


Keywords

Oxygen therapy; High-flow nasal cannula; Hypercapnia; Intubation; Mortality


Cite and Share

Heajin Chung,Young Shin Cho,Suyeon Park. The effects of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in dyspnea patients with and without hypercapnia in the emergency department: a retrospective, propensity score-matched cohort study. Signa Vitae. 2022.doi:10.22514/sv.2022.037.

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