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The prognostic value of laboratory parameters referring to hemopoietic stress in patients with COVID-19—a single center experience

  • István László1
  • Mariann Berhés2
  • Katalin Tisza3
  • Zsófia Miltényi4
  • Norbert Balázsfalvi5
  • Attila Vaskó6
  • László Asztalos7
  • Attila Kertész8
  • Ákos Fábián9
  • János Kappelmayer10
  • Béla Fülesdi11,*,

1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

3Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

4Department of Internal Medicine, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

6Department of Pulmonology, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

7Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

8Department of Cardiology, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

9Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

10Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

11Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Debrecen, Faculty of Medicine, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary

DOI: 10.22514/sv.2022.053

Submitted: 25 March 2022 Accepted: 20 April 2022

Online publish date: 18 July 2022

*Corresponding Author(s): Béla Fülesdi E-mail: fulesdi@med.unideb.hu

Abstract

In the present study we attempted to assess whether a relationship exists between laboratory signs of hemopoietic stress and fatal outcome in coronavirus disease (COVID)-19—positive intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU patients. Prospectively collected data of 206 COVID-19 patients (95 ICU and 111 non-ICU) were retrospectively analyzed. Beside comparing routine laboratory parameters, the analysis focused on nucleated red blood cell count (NRBC), red cell distribution width (RCDW), immature granulocyte count (IG), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW). In the total COVID cohort higher NRBC, RCDW, IG, MPV and PDW values were observed in patients with fatal outcome as compared to survivors. Significant differences could be observed between non-ICU and critically ill patients in NRBC (medians and interquartile range (IQR): 10/0–20/ vs. 20/10–60/ g/L, p < 0.001), IG (0.16/0.04–0.39/ vs. 0.42 /0.20–0.75/ g/L, p < 0.001), MPV (10.9 ± 1.2 vs. 11.4 ± 1.2 fL, p < 0.01) and PDW (14.5/11.6-44.7/ vs. 19.9/13.7–57.7/ fL, p < 0.001), respectively. In the ICU subgroup, RDW and MPV were higher among patients who died. Severe acute respiratory syndrome after coronavirus infection (SARS-CoV-2 infection) causes perturbation of hemopoiesis. Laboratory parameters referring to hemopoietic stress may serve as useful predictors of poor outcome in hospitalized COVID-19 patients needing intensive care.


Keywords

SARS-CoV infection; Hemopoietic stress; Intensive care


Cite and Share

István László,Mariann Berhés,Katalin Tisza,Zsófia Miltényi,Norbert Balázsfalvi,Attila Vaskó,László Asztalos,Attila Kertész,Ákos Fábián,János Kappelmayer,Béla Fülesdi. The prognostic value of laboratory parameters referring to hemopoietic stress in patients with COVID-19—a single center experience. Signa Vitae. 2022.doi:10.22514/sv.2022.053.

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